Database of Funded Projects

The Botstiber Institute for Austrian-American Studies has generously funded academic research and public history projects that promote an understanding of the historic relationship between the United States and Austria. The following search tools make it possible to explore these projects and to learn more about the scholars and organizations who have received BIAAS grants and fellowships.

2021-09-17T15:02:18+00:00

Megan Brandow-Faller

2021
Topics: Art, Gender, History, Migration
Products: Articles, Book

The cult of child creativity taking root in postwar America—or notions that all children are inherently creative with unique access to expressive powers—remains ubiquitous in contemporary American society. But rarely are such discourses connected to their intellectual roots in Secessionist Vienna. My project spotlights the critical role of pedagogue, craftswoman and designer Emmy Zweybrück-Prochaska (1890-1956), a partially-Jewish Austrian-American émigré, in shaping and popularizing Secessionist ideals of child creativity in postwar America. The goal of the grant is fund research for two peer-reviewed essays on Zweybrück’s American influence while feeding into a book project entitled Inventing Child Art in Secessionist Vienna.

2021-09-17T14:45:22+00:00

Allison Schmidt

2021
Topics: History, Migration
Products: Article, Book

Dr. Allison Schmidt has received a $15,000 research grant for her project "Emigration Routes from Austria-Hungary," a focus on emigrant journeys to the United States in the late-nineteenth, early-twentieth century. Archival research in Austrian and Czech Archives will contribute to an article on the subject and a book on state surveillance of the transmigrants in Germany. Allison Schmidt received her PhD from the University of Kansas and currently serves as a Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Pennsylvania.

2021-09-17T14:43:31+00:00

German-American Heritage Center

2021
Topics: History, Migration
Products: Conference, Exhibit, Workshop

The GAHC seeks to present an exhibition, conference, and related events and publications exploring the impact of emigres from Vienna to Iowa from 1846-1868. Several thousand Hapsburg emigres came to Iowa during and after the revolutions of 1848 seeking liberty and freedom. Many of these individuals and families had a lasting impact on the culture, economy, and civic direction of the state, although many returned to Vienna after 1868. We will explore the stories of these emigres and their lasting influence in Iowa. In collaboration with scholars, other cultural organizations, and a Community Advisory Committee, the GAHC will produce a traveling and virtual exhibition on this topic. The main event promoting the exhibition and scholarly work will be a conference held in Davenport, Iowa with participants joining in-person and virtually. The conference will consist of an opening reception, keynote speaker address, workshop, and historic walking tour.

2019-03-12T15:28:55+00:00

Katherine Sorrels

2018
Topics: History, Migration, Psychology, Science
Products: Research

Katherine Sorrels received a BIAAS grant to research Jewish physicians and therapists who fled Nazi Vienna for Scotland, where they founded what would become a global network on intentional communities that cared for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. […]

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